SICILY IS DELICIOUSLY AMAZING IN ANY SEASON

My love for Sicily grows with each visit!

Sicily is filled with cultural enchantment, deep historic origins and offers a wide array of delicious produce and cuisine. My first visit was in the fall of 2014. I returned in the spring of 2015 and recently visited this summer. No matter what time of year you go, Sicily is paradise on earth!

In early August, I spent a delightful afternoon with my Sicilian cousins who took me to Cefalù; it’s an ancient city along the northern coastline that was conquered by the Normans in 1063. Folklore states the King of Sicily, Roger II, made a vow to Jesus that if he escaped a storm at sea he would build a church to him. The King was miraculously spared so in 1131 he requested a Cathedral be erected, designed in Norman architecture. Despite numerous invasions throughout the centuries, the Cathedral of Cefalù is well preserved and its impressive towers still dominate the harbor. The interior of the Cathedral was restored in 1559. Though deterioration is evident, behind the high alter is a magnificent Byzantine mosaic of Jesus that is both breathtaking and humbling. The mosaic is comparable in design to the spectacular Byzantine mosaic of Jesus at the Cathedral of Monreale.

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Something I did not expect to see in the city center of Cefalù and hidden under the Martino Palace was a medieval laundry. I hiked down the steep stairway to the laundry and saw the historic wash tubs, built directly over the river, and constructed out of lava stone about 500 years ago. I couldn’t imagine what life must have been like for the women of Cefalù in the 1600’s. Every day they carried baskets filled with dirty laundry down to the wash tubs, scrub them in the cold river, then took the clean wet laundry back up the stairs to bring home and hang on clothes lines. However, I was very surprised when I learned this ancient laundry practice was still in use until the 1950’s, when the city finally had running water in homes. Yikes! I’ll never complain about doing laundry ever again!

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Though Cefalù was very crowded and repressively hot in August, I enjoyed strolling along the narrow streets with my Sicilian cousins, visiting the quaint shops, seeing beautiful views of the sun drenched sea and watching people having a wonderful time. I also indulged in a Sicilian summertime favorite –refreshing granita. Granita is a flavored ice slushy, usually made with fruit. My choice was the watermelon granita and it was mouthwateringly amazing!!

#Sicily, #Sicilia, #MyBellaSicily, #VisitSicily, #Palermo, #Italy, #Sicilian

 

 

Family: Our link to the past and bridge to the future

I was very close to my paternal grandmother, Ann Comito Battiata. Her father died tragically in a fire on the job when she was only 7. For survival, she married at 15, became a mother at 16, and was a widow by 18. In her heyday she was a Flapper of the Roaring 20’s until she experienced a spiritual awakening in 1930. Her faith carried her through very difficult times, including the Great Depression, WWII, the deaths of her mother and husband, and right up until her own death in July 1977.

Etched in my mind are so many precious memories of her cooking, watching television game shows while knitting a mile a minute, shifting her 3-speed on the column Chevy with her right hand, while holding a cigarette in the left hand, studying the well-worn pages of her Bible, and telling me to ‘never forget your family.’ By profession she was a hair dresser, but also worked at Detroit Tiger Stadium. What a character – she was witty, patient, forgiving and kept secrets of her very arduous past.

After she died, I was heartbroken. I took comfort in researching her Sicilian family, which wasn’t easy in the early 80’s. There was no Ancestry.com or FamilySearch.org. Throughout the years, I’ve gathered remnants of her life, starting with her parents, Angelo Comito and Antonina Barbiera of Partinico. Partinico is an agricultural town about 20 miles southwest of Palermo. They immigrated to Coldwater Michigan in 1907 and my grandmother was born in 1908. After her father died in 1915 her mother took Annie and her little sister Jennie to Detroit, where they knew other families from Partinico. They lost all contact with the family back in Sicily.

SICILY – THE WILD WEST

By the 1990’s I had hit a roadblock in my Sicilian research and concluded the only way to learn more about our family was to go to Sicily. There was just one issue. No it wasn’t the Mafia, I was not afraid of them. I read a book describing where local bandits travel the highways in Sicily stealing from tourists. I pictured a scene from an old western movie, where outlaws swooped down on an unsuspecting stagecoach, forcing travelers to handover their valuables. As a single woman, this depiction made me apprehensive about traveling alone to Sicily. There was no one to go with me, so the trip idea was abandoned.

FATHER KNOWS BEST

Fast forward to September 2013, the yearning to visit Sicily was pulling at me, like an ocean current. I looked into some tours, but I needed a custom tour, so I could spend time researching in Partinico and possibly uncover relatives. My father, now in his late 80’s, suggested I try to get a custom tour and see if any American cousins would go with me. I took his sage advice, (I normally do) and created an event on Facebook. I thought perhaps one or two cousins may be interested, but to my surprise, seven cousins along with their spouses and/or friends wanted to go. Suddenly I found myself the official travel coordinator of 15 going to Sicily in October 2014.

Check out my next post, where I’ll go into more detail about our amazing family trip to Sicily, and whether we were successful at reuniting family in Partinico.